Zero Waste Periods : Cloth Pad Review – Bloom and Nora

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In the UK alone, we use about 4.3 billion single use sanitary products a year. An individual will be using around 11,000 disposable sanitary pads in her lifetime. And an estimated 1.3 million pads get flushed down the toilet, costing millions in clearing blocked drains. These plastic pads not only sit in the landfills for years (around 500 years), but the toxins used in these pads are polluting our oceans, thereby endangering the great marine life. The dioxins and carcinogens that are in these pads, enter our bodies through contact and can be literally deadly. So what is the solution?

Switch To More Sustainable and Healthier Options – Resuseable Cloth Pads

I have been using a menstruation cup for years now after having experienced terrible rashes from disposable pads and extreme dryness from tampons. But I could not go zero waste with my period right away. The cup is not the most convenient thing to empty, wash and insert back in in public washrooms. And I go on long walks which again makes cleaning after a few hours a difficult job, so I always used a sanitary pad to go with my menstruation cup. I might have cut down my use of disposable sanitary products by 90% but not completely.

Enter Bloom and Nora Cloth Pads

Bloom and Nora sent me their trail pack of sanitary pads made with 100% natural fibres. It was an opportunity for me to go zero waste in the red zone area, and I couldn’t have been more delighted.

I was sent a trail kit with two blooms and two Nora pads ranging between their four available sizes. I have used them over the past three cycle and I think I have enough experience to share my thoughts with you.

Blooms are basically made of bamboo core making it extremely soft against your skin and super duper absorbent. My baby uses bamboo nappies and I always thought he is so lucky to have something so cushy against his bits. Now I know how good it actually feels!!

Nora’s are known for it’s stay dry technology and stain proof quality and I have to say, after three cycles they still look as pearly as new.

Performance

In terms of performance, they get five stars from me. Not only are they soft but also leak proof. The outer PUL protects the clothing from getting wet and the leak proof edges prevents blood from seeping out.

The Nora Maxi and Bloom Mighty were the perfect team for the first day and night which is when my flow is the heaviest.

And Midi and Mini have performed excellently paired with my menstruation cup on long hikes and walks where there was no access to private toilet or cleaning facility. These pads successfully held any leaks from the overflowing cups and kept me dry and comfortable enough to finish my journey.

Life changer

One thing that I love about cloth pad is the fact that I don’t get any rashes. Disposables have the quality of drying out the skin which often left me with a rash. So not only did I have to go through the cycle (which in itself is an inconvenience) but also suffer in agony days after my period was over.

Washing

As a cloth nappy mama, it was no science for me know how this stuff worked, but for noobs I would recommended atleast three washes (no soap required) before use. This helps with the absorbency. You will see the absorbency improve with use.

After use, wash the blood off with cold tap water and put it either in your laundry basket or in the bathroom bag by Bloom and Nora, which is perfect to keep all the soiled pads together.

When ready, wash it on 40 degrees with a non-bio detergent. No need to tumble dry. Honestly, these pads dry in a flash and tumble drying may not damage the pads right away but will take away a few years of performance from it.

Price

Each one of the pads are less than a tenner and you will need about 10 to 12 pads each cycle. Less if you wash them more regularly. So a £100 for the next 5 years seems like a reasonable investment. That is less than £1.80 a month towards your period.

Conclusion

After having used both Bloom and Nora Pads, my favourites have to the bamboo Bloom pads. It felt the softest and most comfortable against my skin and felt light but sturdy. Nora had no performance issue but my skin was not necessary always happy with it. I felt the urge to change more frequently with Nora than in Blooms.

Also absolutely loved the poppers unlike the sticky wings of the disposables (often tore my knickers). They held the pads in place for hours and the wings were wide enough to prevent leaks but slim enough for comfort.

I also prefer Bloom for it’s colours, they suit my personality bold and bright.

Bloom and Nora is inspired by the daredevil feminist Amelia Bloomer who once said, “When you find a burden in belief or apparel, cast it off”

Disposable pads put a lot of burden on our environment and health, I think it is time we cast it off too. What do you think??

 

 

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Baby Led Weaning – A New Parenting Flavour

Annaprashon – first taste of food

Introducing solids to our babies is one of the most exciting experiences in anybody’s parenting journey. It is also the babies first step towards achieving independence in terms of feeding himself. And whilst for years, spoon feeding and puree foods were the go to options, the tides have changed and now we have a new style of feeding called Baby Led Weaning.

Baby Led Weaning is a method by which babies are expected to play with their food and feed themselves. They are given the freedom to eat whatever they want from the table and decide how much or how little they want to eat. This method is now known for helping children develop a positive association with food and hence, help raise children who are not picky or fussy with food.

RoRo’s Journey

I have chosen a rather easy going parenting style with RoRo. I have also never had any children of my own before, so I had a fresh clean parenting slate and I wanted to go with the new style. So RoRo, in my care practiced a lot of baby led weaning and I do give this method a lot of credit for his eating skills from very early on and how fuss free he has been so far. At age two, I can take him to any restaurant and not panic. He will eat what is on the plate and he behaves relatively well for his age. Partly nature, partly nurture!

My husband, on the other hand, has two older children and when they were little, he practiced the bog standard old fashioned method of feeding and well they have turned out good eaters too. So my husband was pretty convinced in his spoon feeding method. Hence, over the weekends or whenever he was home, he would request me to puree his food and insist on spoon feeding him. I grudgingly let it happen, as a lot of bonding took place and to be honest, RoRo didn’t mind. I think he is a bit of a foodie from birth.

So the lesson learnt from his journey is that whilst I vouch for Baby Led Weaning and today, my husband would also agree that it is the way forward, no matter how bloody scary it is to see your baby gagg (only to realise it is a reflex that is important to develop) at times, there is no need to be a purist. I hand fed the older children from age 4 to 7 years, they have perfectly developed cutlery skills, table manners and eating habits.

Baby Led Weaning or BLW has a lot of benefits and it would be a shame to not make the most of it, but traditional methods does help bond if nothing, when done right (i.e no force feeding or feeding in disguise like puree).

Food Before One Is For Fun

I was told this by my friend and it stayed with me forever. And before we as parents even start thinking about introducing solids to our children we must remember that babies do not have to eat big meals or half of what is on offer to fill up their bellies or to get the appropriate nutrition. It is highly recommended that babies get their nutrition and fill themselves up on milk (breastmilk preferrably).

Please try to enjoy the process of introducing new flavours, textures and colours of food to your baby in the first year than worry about how fussy they seem. If you put up with the so called fussyness now, you are likely to get less fussiness when the baby grows up.

Oh, and be prepared for the mess! You might have to wash them three times a day. I would highly recommend getting a dog who can hoover up the floor and lick the food off the legs of the chairs and tables. Just kidding! (not really)

Choking Hazards

One of the biggest concerns with blw is chokind hazard. So whilst this method is relatively hands off compared to the traditional method. Parents are still suggested to cut the food into tiny pieces or into very large pieces. BLW does not cause any more choking than spoon feeding.

The rule of thumb is to make sure that the food is either smaller or larger than a pound coin but as I always say use your instinct. So foods like grapes or cherry tomatoes will need cutting into halves before offering it to your baby.

Anything small will pass through the airways and come out the other end. I remember being surprised by RoRo eating a cherry with the pip in. He ate the flesh around it and he knew that the pip was not to be swallowed. This was at age one I think. So as time passes with blw you will know your child’s abilities and you will feed him food by judging his skills level.

It is also important to note that blw should be introduced only when the child is ready. The signs include sitting up unassisted, being able to hold the head up without help, being able to reach out and grab things and being able to do the whole hand to mouth thing. All these skills develop around 6 months of age, in some cases it may take longer.

Iron

Iron is another thing most parents worry about a lot especially with BLW. Now triple that pressure when feeding your child a vegan diet. There is a myth going around about protein, iron etc or lack of it in vegan diet. Let’s not even go there.

Anyhow, if breastfeeding on demand, you should not worry about iron in your baby at all. And formula’s are fortified so there we go. I am not sure why is there so much of a muchness.

If not breastfeeding, make sure your baby consumes food rich in iron. You would be surprised how easy it is to feed iron rich food to kids.

Food source: brown rice, tomatoes, collard greens, kale, tofu, legumes, lentils, ), quinoa, oatmeal etc.

Just eating food rich in iron will not do. One must consume enough vitamin c daily inorder to absorb iron. Just one orange a day will cover your daily intake of vitamin c. It is that easy! Also, if in doubt, supplement.

Trying Street Food In India

Feed Whatever You Are Eating

The benefit of this method is that you do not have to cook or prepare separate meals for the baby. And please do not tell me making purees only takes a minute. Sure! And please also do not tell me how you puree everything you are eating, so basically it is the same as blw. Feeding a child a homogeneous mush does not appeal to me and I am sure it does not appeal to most babies either. They eat it because there is no other option, they don’t know any better or they simply spit it out and end up fussy. Sorry if I sound judgemental. If I can’t eat what I give to my child, I simply won’t give it to my child. I think that is cruel.

Anyhow, in the early days I remember cooking baby friendly meals for the family. So we ate a lot of roasted vegetables cut up lengthwise, thick soups, stews, dal, beans, couscous and rice etc. The food became more and more complicated as he grew older and we became more confident. But I never cooked him a separate meal. Not that I can recollect.

Eating Together

This method also encourages families to eat together. Monkey see monkey do. So the idea is if your babies watched you eat nicely at the table, they are likely to imitate you. So this is a good opportunity to get those table manners, cutlery skills and table talk practiced and polished.

I do not eat with my kids, because my kids eat at 6pm and that is way to early for me. But I always sit down at the table with all my three kids with a cup of tea. Babies learn a lot and a lot quicker from their siblings. But over the weekends, we eat together no matter what time. It not only develops positive association and great bond  between family members, it also teaches babies how to share as they watch us pass the food around, eat off each others plates (ofcourse we all do that, no?) etc.

It is recommended that one uses a high chair to make meals times less messy and so the baby can reach the food easily. But a parents lap works equally well. We progressed from a bumbo chair with a tray to highchairs to now just a regular chair.

Healthy Opportunity

Babies do learn a lot from watching us. And because blw encourages eating together, babies are likely to pick up on bad eating habits from us. Hence, this blw is a good opportunity to get back on the healthy diet plan and boycotting the naughty junk food culture. Eat a bowl of salad or drink some smoothies instead of a milkshake or a bag of chips. The baby is watching. He may not be ready to share that bowl of salad yet but trust me, he is watching and eagerly waiting to try it when he is ready.

Food Ideas

It is recommended that we must introdube one or two food at a time and only introduce new food every 3 to 5 days but I’d say go with your instinct. We like variety and RoRo grew up on that.

. always offer fresh water with your every meal

. do not give babies juice or squash until they are atleast a year old.

. No dairy, honey or whole nuts.

. cook spinach and other leafy veg, remove peels from apples as they can get stuck and cause discomfort.

. don’t shy away from bold and spicy flavours but do not make anything extra hot. If you want a spice loving child, introduce the flavour gradually.

6 months to 8 months

RoRo was always offered a piece of fruit, dates, avocados or roasted veggies, hummus etc as his standard meal. But we always let him have a taste of whatever that we were eating too (if something was too spicy, we would still let him have a lick from our finger). For instance, aloo bhaaji (potato curry), or indian breakfasts like poha, sabudana or aloo parathas etc.

At this age, they are just so pleased to be given this opportunity to eat that they don’t care whether you are eating with them or not and if what you are eating is different from theirs. They are using this opportunity for sensory explosion.  They are developing fine motor skills ( picking up green peas), and gross motor skills like reaching the food and bringing it to the mouth or even oral motor skills, chewing and then deciding whether to swallow or to spit.

8 to 10 months

This is an interesting age. At this age, they can almost express happiness at the sight of the food that they are familar with or like. They also start to develop the skills to use a straw or drink from a cup. I gave RoRo straw at around this age. He couldn’t do much initially but they are clever little things, he started using the straw like a pro by the time he was 9 months old. This is when I introduced green smoothies to him.

This is also the age where their spoon to month skills also start to look more purposeful. So go all out with the yogurht pots, bowls of soup or porridge or cereal. It is messy and little to no food may go into the tummy, but a lot of other learning is taking place, so encourage that.

Dal and rice, sushi, steamed veggies, nut butter and toast, cooked or uncooked tofu etc go down very well. We also started offering him a variety of beans and legumes and pulses. He devoured them. Chickpeas being his favourite.

10 to 12 months:

This is the age of cooked food. As vegans, we always have fresh uncooked fruits and veggies on offer and we eat them throughout the day. Up until 10 months, RoRo would be satisfied with just those but now he was interested in cooked food more. We actually started eating good portions of his cooked food be it fried mushrooms for breakfast or scrambled tofu, fried rice or naked burgers for lunch or beans curry and rice for dinner.

1 years and up:

He would eat everthing at this age apart from nuts. We offered nuts in energy balls made with dates. It was around 20 months we realised RoRo could eat whole nuts. And this may be too early for some children so I would watch out and use parental judgement and instincts.

Tips for Spoon Feeding

As mentioned earlier, We aren’t purists and so we have helped RoRo a few times by feeding him. But when I say feeding, we don’t mean we kept shoving spoonfuls in his mouth and depositing food in the top half of his mouth and wiping the excess from around his mouth with the spoon.

We offered a spoonful a few inches away from his mouth whilst asking him gently if he’d like to eat it, we then either waited for a cue from him, i.e, a forward lean of the head or hands reaching out for the spoon and as he grew older, we’d let him grab the spoon and bring it to his mouth all on his own. And we always respected the fact that if he is not opening his mouth, he is not hungry. Period! There was no silly aeroplanes or televisions or birds in the sky to trick him into eating.

RoRo Now

Now RoRo is a total foodie. He will eat anything on offer and is open to trying new things. He loves spicy and savoury food items. His favourite flavour happens to be tangy. He will sit and suck on a whole lemon quite merrily.

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make A Green Smoothie That Kids Would Love

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We have been making green smoothies since the past two years. I come from a culture where a lot of delicious meals were cooked. There was hardly ever a green salad involved except the occasional cucumber slices . Having come to England, and being convinced by my husband the benefits of eating raw veggies especially greens, we have been consuming a lot of salads. I have to be honest that gulping down bowls and bowls of salad is not easy for me. I do it, (to set an example for the kids) but it is not necessarily my favourite way of getting those greens into my system. Let’s talk green smoothies!!

Since going vegan, the need for greens into my diet has become more pronounced than ever before. Everybody needs greens but once you go vegan you actually start thinking about your health and start watching your diet (if you are the conscious kind). Kids today need greens more than ever before with all the toxic substances and pollutants that are ingested into our system through various sources especially food.

Green smoothies are a great way to detoxify our system. Collard greens and kale actually have the quality of removing toxins from our body whilst adding a ton of nutrients into our system. So yes, let’s feed our kids those greens!

My baby is now 23 months and has been consuming green smoothies since he started solids really. He absolutely loves smoothies along with my big kids who are 11 and 10 years of age. I am lucky I have three beautiful, healthy and absolutely fuss free kids who would even drink a brown smoothie easily. But I do get asked a lot about how to introduce green smoothies to kids who would run a mile from anything that is green.

Let me give you a recipe for our go to green smoothie first:

Ingredients: (I don’t measure so please use your instincts)

two handfuls of spinach/kale/collards

2 – 3 bananas

1 mango or a cup of diced pineapples

1/2 inch of ginger (optional)

some spirulina or wheatgrass powder (optional)

juice of a lemon

Coconut Milk and Water (one or the other or both, adjust quantity according to the consistency)

Method:

Whack it all in the blender and boom! It is no rocket science to be honest.

Here are some tips that might help you along on your journey to green smoothies

1. Start Early And Practice Before Your Preach

As mentioned above, I started my baby on green smoothies when he was as little over 8 months old. He watched me consume green smoothies since birth and when he started solids, he obviously was eager to try everything he saw us consume. So when he could successfully drink from a cup or was enthusiastic about using a straw, I started giving him green smoothies. Hence, the love for smoothies persists.

But one can introduce green smoothies at any point in their children’s diet. I would recommend introducing it into your own diet first. Keep drinking it regularly and talk about your experience in terms of flavour, health and how good you feel. Share the excitement of how you are looking forward to your green smoothie etc. And offer some to your kids. They may say No but that should not stop you from drinking yours. They will come around.

When my daughter fussed about mushroom in her diet, that didn’t stop me from cooking mushroom stroganoff?! I always asked her to have a little bit just for my sake and then eat whatever else she preferred. After months of this, she now successfully can eat a meal of mushroom stroganoff with no alternative available.

2.Colour is key

Kids like anything bright in colour. Now green is quite often a likeable colour amongst kids. The trick to get bright green colour is to use fresh greens (organic if possible). Adding green powders like wheatgrass or spirulina will help you get a varied variety of green colours from light to dark to bright.

Having said that if you kid is not happy with green. Try adding beetroot and strawberries in their green smoothies. These two ingredients will dye the smoothie red. Now kids like red right?!

3.Ease Them Into It

If your children would drink a yellow smoothie. Make one. Yellow smoothie is completely fruit based including pineapple, bananas and mangoes. Now whilst it is highly recommended that we eat our fruits and not drink, it won’t hurt your kids to enjoy a glass every few days just to enjoy the idea of smoothies. Once they start enjoying it, start experimenting.

“Shall we try making a red one today? (add beets) Shall we make a purple one today? (add a bit of blueberries) and then say let’s try green one?” you get the drift!

4.Flavour

Ok, my green smoothies are not very sweet. My toddler never had very sweet smoothies so he never knew any better. But my older kids had to be eased into enjoying green smoothies without it being too sweet. Watching sugar intake is essential and hence it is recommended that green smoothies have more veggies and less fruits.

But in order to ease your children into the green smoothies I would suggest adding more fruits to begin with and gradually taking some out.

If you kids like tang, add a bit of lemon juice or pineapple so it overpowers the flavour of the greens (which can be a bit bitter)

5.High Speed Blender

This is a must. Green are super fibrous and hence very healthy for us. But the texture is not for everyone. A high speed blender blend things really fine. Also a high speed blender will blend things very quicky therefore, prevent the veg and fruits from oxidising.

6.Texture

Add atleast one or two creamy ingredient like avocado or bananas. This will help make your smoothie nice and creamy and take away the fibrous texture from the greens.

7. Get Them To Help

My kids love helping me out in the kitchen especially my toddler. I get my big kids to chop whilst the little one puts everything into the blender and presses the buttons. I am a huge advocate of letting children help and it’s positive effects on their eating habits. So get those kids to help. Kitchen gets a bit messy but it is worth it.

8. Keep Using Positive Praises

Always praise the children for trying something. Even if they drink just a few sips, praise them for doing so. Always ask them to taste it. And if they refuse it after tasting show them that you trust in their choice. Praise them for trying and if they are a bit older ask them what do they think would make this smoothie better. Try not to be harsh when they refuse to drink it or struggle to finish it off. And just because they refused it or struggled with it does not mean you have to give up. Stay persistent. It will pay off.

 

I hope you find this post helpful. Please let me know through likes and comments. 

Follow me on instagram: @beachwalkmuse

 

Vegan Chocolate Pumpkin Seed Cookies

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“This is by far, as tasty a cookie (if not more) as your non – vegan ones”, my non – vegan husband. Now that’s a compliment because it is NOT always easy to get a 100% approval from non –  vegans!

These cookies have aquafaba in them and I think that made a huge difference. Aquafaba iz the liquid from a tin of chickpeas.

If you soak dry chickpeas overnight, don’t throw away the golden liquid.

Aquafaba is by far the best natural and cheap egg replacer. I used a non vEgan recipe for my cookies but simply replaced eggs with aquafaba.

Aquafaba can stay in a clean air tight or sealed glass jar for a week or so in the fridge.

Measuring it is fairly simple too.

3 tablespoon aquafaba = 1 egg

It takes a good 15 minutes to beat the aquafaba to fluff up just like a beaten egg. So be patient. It does come together. Good luck.

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Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups plain flour

1/2 cup cacao powder(or cocoa)

1 1/2 cup coconut sugar (or brown/white)

1/2 – 1 cup pumpkin seeds (or nuts)

2 tablespoons margarine (or 1/2 cup of oil)

1/2 teaspoon baking soda (not powder)

6 tablespoons aquafaba

1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika (optional)

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Half a bar of vegan dark chocolate, chopped ( I used bournville)

Method:

In a saucepan, using an electric whisk blend in the butter and sugar. Now add aquafaba little bit at a time. Keep whisking until the mixture is fluffy. Don’t worry if it’s a bit runny. It will still work. But give it a good go first.

Now add all the other ingredients apart from the flour and seeds. Blend it all in.

Next add the seeds and flour. Using a wooden spatula or spoon combine the ingredients.

Once combine, refrigerate for 30 mins. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 160 degrees.

After half an hour, spoon the cookie dough onto your baking tray. Either lay reusable baking sheet or grease the tray first.

Pop them in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes. They should be still soft when you take them out. Leave them on the train for a minute before you transfer them on a rack. It will crisp up as it cools.

Viola!

 

Seed Crackers Recipe – Vegan

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At 20 months, my toddler has started enjoying toasted seeds like pumpkin and sunflower seeds. He also enjoys eating a good amount of crisps. So incorporating healthy seeds into a crisp seemed natural and way forward.

These crisps are perfect for playdates,  picnics or a party. They are great with hummus or any other spread of your choice. Full of fats and antioxidants, feed them to their toddlers and yourselves if you can.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup of linseed

1/2 cup of pumpkin seeds

1/2 cup of Chia seeds

Salt and pepper (2 pinches)

Sufficient water

Method:

Mix all the indregients in a bowl and let it sit for an hour or so until all the Chia seeds have turned into a jelly like texture. You can use flax instead of Chia seeds or both and any choice of seeds for that matter.

Spread the mixture in a well oiled baking tray and flatten the mixture with a knife. Pop the tray in a preheated oven at 180 degrees for 20 mins or until brown on one side. Remove and flip it over and cook for another 20 mins or until crispy.

Voila!

 

 

 

Cloth Nappy no0b? My Top 10 Tips

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I have been advocating cloth nappies since baby Roshan was teeny weeny. The more I use them, the more I believe in them. It is a learning process and a very satisfying journey too.

For a beginner, the world of cloth nappies can seem like a minefield. And that is exactly how disposables became a successful industry. It is easy to not have to research or think twice –  just buy a packet of disposable nappies that require no prep, no laundry and no maintenance (none of which is actually as tedious as it may sound).

I remember as a newbie, asking my friend Ashleigh scores of questions about the nappies as she had been using it for months. With her help and a lot of research, I finally settled for the cloth nappies I wanted and never looked back.

Here are some of my handy tips for anybody who wants to consider cloth nappying their child:

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1. Try them all

There are a variety of cloth nappy brands. I would recommend picking a few popular brands and trying one or two of each before you build or buy your stash. What may suit one baby may not suit another. What your friend may find easier to deal with may not be your cup of tea.

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2. Embrace secondhand nappies

The whole idea of reuseable nappies is not just to reuse it on your own child. Cloth nappies have such a long shelf life that there’s a huge second hand market for it where you can buy very expensive brands for cheap to try on before investing. I brought many a brands for second hand before naming my favourites. They tend to come very clean and very well maintained.

Nappy Libraries are also very helpful. Seek advice there. You will be amazed!

3. Always pre-wash

New or second hand, always pre-wash your nappies. New nappies often get better in terms of absorbency with multiple washes. And with second hand stuff, you want to make sure that there isn’t any debris, bacteria or dust (in case it’s been sitting in someone’s cupboards for a while).

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4. All-in-ones

Even though rumours abound about all-in-ones not being as efficient as the others, some of them are very good indeed. TotsBots easyfit stars are my favourite British brand – suitable for use overnight or for outings when we know we won’t be back within 2 hours. And always have some ‘all-in-‘ones handy for travel. It makes changing quicker and less bulky to carry!

5. Doesn’t have to be all or none

If you are into your disposables or are finding the idea of going all out with your cloth nappies, then don’t. We still use disposables from time time especially when camping or going for a weekend stay at a friends. So ease yourself into using cloth nappies. Maybe start with night time nappies or pop one on when at home.

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The best way to dry your washed nappies is to let them dry in the sun. Sun is known to remove stains and kill harmful bacteria too. In England, sunshine seems like a joke, but the weather in England is, on the contrary, really beneficial for the nappies.

Just sunshine tends to leave the nappies very crisp and slightly rough, whereas a bit of sunshine followed by shade is perfect to keep the fabric soft.

7. Let it rain

Every now and again, it is a good idea to strip wash your nappies. I do it maybe once every couple of months, sometimes I leave them for a bit longer. In England, strip washing simply happens accidentally to be honest.

Strip washing is basically a process where you wash your nappies completely clean of any detergent residue or any general wear and tear to make sure the nappies are as good as new, and it helps improve the absorbency too.

One of the best ways to strip wash is to leave the nappies out for couple of days or more when it is raining. This should be done after the nappies have been washed once in the machine with detergent. Instead of bringing the nappies back home after they have dried, the idea is to let it get rained on for a few days.

This can be done by using washing machine too. Simply wash the nappies once with detergent and then do a few more washes without any detergent. It is just that rain is free of cost.

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8. Get organised

Cloth nappying is not just about choosing and buying nappies. Make sure you have a bucket for soiled nappies, wet bags to carry soiled nappies back home when traveling, a non-bio detergent and a washing machine (basic I know)

One other essential I would recommend is an electric clothes hanger. During winter this little technology works wonders.

9. Laundry Routine

Laundry really doesn’t have to be so tedious. Make sure you have a routine though. It is very easy to get used to and if you have bigger kids, they can help too. I wash my nappies every other day (it is especially helpful if you have a small stash). And I do clothes in between. The only time I skip doing any laundry is when it has been raining and my nappies haven’t dried yet.

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10. Cloth Wipes

Not only is it environmentally friendly and chemical free, it is also very practical.

Just how disposable wipes can be chucked into the bin along with disposable nappies, cloth wipes can be chucked into the cloth nappy bin after use and washed along with the nappies in the same wash.

The only time I use disposable wipes is when outdoors. So again, it doesn’t have to be all or none. A little bit of both works quite harmoniously for us.

Please let me know if you have any more tips to add in the comments below.

Review & Uses: Tots Bots Happy Mat And Wet Bags

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In16 months of my child’s life, I have never once used a changing mat. Don’t be alarmed: it hasn’t all been dirty floors, green fields and absorbent sofas :/

My mum made some amazing handmade quilt-like mats out of old cotton sarees and believe it or not, I have been relying on those all these months.

So when Tots Bots offered me to try out their Happy Mat and Wet Bag, I was pretty pleased. Old sarees are great, easy to wash and colourful, but not very waterproof…

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The new addition to Tots Bots Happy Mat and Wet Bag collection is in my favourite print, Kaleidoscope. The mathas three layers: super-absorbent fluffy top layer, a squishy padded middle layer and a waterproof bottom layer.

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If you are a cloth nappy user, you’ll be familiar with the vital wet bag: these are used to keep the dirty, wet and soiled nappies separated from the dry ones. Tots Bots’ wet bags are completely leak-proof, just like their nappies, and can hold up to 8 soiled nappies. They have a zipper to lock the nappies in and a little snap-on handle.

More Than Just A Nappy Accessory

In the past few weeks that we have been using these products we realised that they have more uses than just one.

Here are some of the different ways in which we have been using the happy mat and the wet bag:

1. Play Scene 

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My kids enjoy creative play and we entertain a lot of child-led playing. The other day I found my children had turned  the  colourful happy mat into jungle! The blue kaleidoscope prints were a massive ocean and the fluffy orange was sand. Wooden animals were running rampant.

2. Play Mat

Baby Ro also uses the Happy Mat to simply sit and play on when the floor isn’t cosy on its own.

3. Picnics

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We took both the happy mat and the wet bag to the picnic with us. The mat was perfect for little Ro to sit on and enjoy a few snacks whilst the wet bag was perfect to store some picnic food.  Before heading home from our picnic we used the same mat to change nappy and stored the soiled nappy in the wet bag. It totally saved us from carrying the extra baggage.

4. Swim Kit

Living by the seaside means we find ourselves on the beach quite frequently. We also find ourselves wet very often whether from a small splash in the waves or a swim in the sea, the wet bags come handy in packing up those wet clothes whilst keeping rest of the nappy bag dry.

5. Food Shopping

As a baby wearer I often use a rucksack for carrying extra nappies and other supplies. I also use the rucksack for storing any small food shopping that I have to do. I do not like to purchase plastic bags when shopping, so I sometimes use the wet bag to store food items especially frozen bags of food. It helps keep the rest of the stuff in the bag dry whilst still keeping my hands free as the wet bag fits perfectly in my rucksack even when full.

For the ones who have a buggy, can simply use the snap handles to attach the wet bag full of shopping on to the buggy.

6. Cushion

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The happy mat rolls up easily and the attached strings helps to hold it together by tying a knot around it. This makes it super convenient to pack in the bag but has also been providing my eldest with great neck/head support whilst reading outdoors or simply resting.

7. Mattress Protector

Recently, I have realised my son manages to take his nappy off in his sleep and wakes up bare bottoms every morning. There is a risk of him peeing in bed and I have been using the happy mat as a mattress protector of sorts. I simply place it under his bottoms when I realise that he has taken his nappy off. I prefer this over risking waking him up whilst trying to put the nappy back on. He has managed to pee once on the mat in our bed but the mattress was dry and the sheets were clean too.

Tots Bots is selling their new Kaleidoscope Happy Mat and Wet Bag as a set for an absolute bargain at £22 exclusively available on their website.